Archive:


CAPTCHA Image
Get New Code

Posts for: May, 2013

By Gregory J. Gauthier DDS, LLC
May 30, 2013
Category: Oral Health
CrackedToothSyndrome

You may never have heard of cracked tooth syndrome. However, while it is often difficult to diagnose, this condition can be very serious, and it will be helpful to familiarize yourself with the symptoms.

Cracked tooth syndrome can be summed up in three phases: craze lines, cracks and fractures. Craze lines refer to miniscule cracks in the outer enamel surface of a tooth. While they do not cause immediate harm to the tooth, they can lead to true cracks in the enamel that actually penetrate the dentin.

This can lead to a fracture, where the crack extends deep into the tooth. The deeper the crack, the worse the symptoms. If the fracture exposes the pulp, the living tissue within the tooth, it must be treated immediately in order to save the tooth. Fractures are now the third leading cause of tooth loss. This increase may be the result of several factors, including longer life spans and higher stress levels that may lead to increased teeth clenching and grinding.

The complications surrounding the diagnosis of cracked tooth syndrome stem from the fact that symptoms vary, depending upon the location of the crack and what other structures are involved.

  • If you feel a sharp, intense pain for a short amount of time during chewing, then you likely have a crack in a “vital” tooth in which the nerve has not been affected. If a crack reaches the nerve, the pulp tissues housing that nerve will become inflamed and sensitive to temperature changes.
  • On the other hand, if you have a crack in a tooth without living pulp, the symptoms may be vague. It's often difficult to locate where the pain is coming from until the tissues around the teeth are affected. If a crack involves periodontal structures (gum, periodontal ligament and bone), symptoms may include tenderness around the tooth, in which case it will be easy to discern the affected tooth.
  • Finally, when a crack increases and becomes a true fracture, the symptoms strengthen. If located in the crown of the tooth, a piece of the tooth may come off, becoming quite sensitive to temperature change and sweet foods. If the crack is located in the root, you will experience pain of increasing intensity.

Keep in mind that early diagnosis is of utmost importance, so we will always conduct a thorough examination to check for signs and symptoms of cracked tooth syndrome. The earlier it is detected, the easier it will be to repair, so be sure to share with us any pain or discomfort that you have been experiencing.

If you would like more information about cracked tooth syndrome, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Cracked Tooth Syndrome.”


By Gregory J. Gauthier DDS, LLC
May 15, 2013
Category: Oral Health
BadBreathmdashSufferNoMore

While most people can expect to have a temporary case of bad breath after eating spiced foods like garlic, smoking, drinking coffee or wine, odor that persists and becomes chronic is not something to take lightly. We can help diagnose the underlying cause of your bad breath, making both you and the people around you much happier!

Chronic bad breath, also known as “halitosis,” affects about 25% of Americans to some extent. Treating the condition effectively requires a thorough oral examination to uncover the source of the odor. Although some forms of bad breath can be caused by medical conditions like diabetes, lung infections, even kidney failure and cancer, between 85% and 90% of cases originate in the mouth. There are more than 600 types of bacteria found in the average mouth and, given the right (or, should we say, wrong) oral environment, dozens of these bacteria can produce foul odors including a “rotten egg” smell from the production of volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs).

Some of the oral causes of bad breath include:

  • Naturally occurring bacteria found on the back of the tongue that thrive on food deposits, dead skin cells and post nasal drip (Yuck!);
  • Dry mouth, after sleeping, especially when an individual breathes through his or her mouth;
  • Unclean dentures;
  • Decaying or abscessed teeth;
  • Diseased gums; and
  • Infected tonsils.

Once the exact origin of the odor has been determined, we can tell you what form of treatment you'll need to successfully banish the bad breath for good. If your problem is merely the result of poor oral hygiene you can play a large role in turning your situation around. In any case, treatments for mouth-related halitosis can include:

  • A careful, at-home plaque control routine using dental floss and a special toothbrush designed to clean between teeth — nobody really knows how to properly clean without professional instruction;
  • In-office and at-home tongue cleaning using a tongue scraper or brush;
  • Instruction on how to properly clean your dentures;
  • To treat underlying gum disease, periodontal therapy in the form of a deep cleaning, also known as scaling or root planing; and
  • Extraction of wisdom teeth that exhibit debris-trapping gum tissue traps.

So if you are ready to toss your breath mints away and pursue a more permanent solution to rectify your mouth odor, call our office today to schedule an appointment. For more information about the causes of bad breath, read the Dear Doctor magazine article “Bad Breath: More Than Just Embarrassing.”