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Posts for tag: oral health

By Gregory J. Gauthier DDS, LLC
May 02, 2014
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral health   oral hygiene  
OralIrrigationforCleaningBetweentheTeeth

Does anyone truly enjoy flossing their teeth? We can’t rule it out — but for most of us, flossing is something we do because we understand how very important it is to our oral hygiene. Yet there are some for whom flossing is a much greater challenge — for example, people with limited mobility, or those who are wearing braces. Is there any alternative to flossing that offers these people the same health benefits?

Perhaps — but before we discuss the options, let’s remember why flossing is so important. The number one enemy of your oral health is plaque: a sticky, bacteria-rich film that builds up on the surface of your teeth every day. Flossing is an effective means of removing plaque from the tiny spaces in between the teeth — the places a regular brush can’t reach. Left alone, plaque builds up into a hardened layer called tartar or calculus, which generally requires a professional cleaning with special dental tools to remove. Both plaque and tartar are the major causes of tooth decay and gum disease.

If you are unable to remove plaque via regular flossing, a tool called an oral irrigator may help. Sometimes called a “water flosser” or “pick,” this device is designed to squirt a pulsing jet of high-pressure water through a hand-held wand. Special tips may be also available for use with braces or dental implants.

Since these devices first became widely available in the 1960s, they have been the subject of many studies. The general conclusion from the research has been that water irrigators can be helpful in controlling plaque — particularly in people who would otherwise have trouble doing so. For example, a 2008 study showed that orthodontic patients who used an irrigator with a special tip after brushing normally were able to remove five times as much plaque as those who used brushing alone.

Oral irrigators aren’t just for use in the home. Many dental offices use similar devices for special treatments that can help control gum disease. Of course, in that case, the professional-grade tool is handled by a specially trained dental hygienist, dentist, or periodontist — and it’s part of a procedure that may also involve other manual or power instruments, plus special cleaning solutions.

So does it make sense to use an oral irrigator instead of flossing? For most people, flossing is probably the best way to ensure that you remove as much plaque as possible. But if for some reason you aren’t able to floss effectively, using an oral irrigator offers some well-documented benefits. Why not ask us the next time you come in? We can help you decide which method is right for you, and even demonstrate the most effective techniques for plaque removal.

If you would like more information about oral irrigators, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Cleaning Between Your Teeth: How Water Flossing Can Help.”

By Gregory J. Gauthier DDS, LLC
April 24, 2014
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral health   nutrition  
HerbalSupplementsDoYouHavetoTellYourDentist

If you’ve come in to our office lately, chances are you’ve been asked to fill out a form or answer a question about what medications — both prescription and non-prescription — you are currently using. Of course, if you’re taking a blood-pressure drug or a pill to help control your cholesterol, you wouldn’t hesitate to put it on the list. But how about those vitamins and herbal supplements you take — do you really have to list those too?

The answer is a definite yes — and some of the reasons why may surprise you. Did you know that many “natural” dietary supplements can have potentially serious interactions with other drugs you may be prescribed? For example, herbal preparations made from the plant called St. John’s Wort are often used by people seeking relief from depression or anxiety. However, the active chemical compounds in this herb can interfere with some anesthetic drugs, and may make it harder for you to recover from the effects of anesthesia. Ginkgo biloba and some other commonly used herbs have a similar effect.

Even some vitamins have the potential to cause negative interactions. Large doses of Vitamin E, for example, can increase the risk of internal bleeding in people who are taking blood thinners or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications (NSAIDS), such as aspirin and ibuprofen. These medications are commonly prescribed for pain relief after minor dental procedures.

Does that mean you have to stop taking vitamins and herbal supplements if you may need a dental or medical procedure? Not necessarily. Vitamins are indeed vital to your health, and a deficiency in one or more of these important substances can result in serious diseases — like scurvy, which formerly plagued sailors lacking access to fresh fruits and vegetables. If you’ve been told you have a vitamin deficiency, taking vitamin pills is a must.

But the best way to get the proper amount of vitamins is through a healthy, well-balanced diet rich in fruits, vegetables, and whole grains. Not only does consuming these foods give you the most “natural” source of vitamins — it also provides you with other essential micronutrients and fiber, and it is low in fat and cholesterol.

No nutritional supplement is a substitute for a healthy diet — and that’s something we’d like everyone to remember. We’d also like to remind you to tell us about ALL the medications and supplements you’re taking, especially if you’re going to have a procedure. Giving us complete information will help ensure that you’ll remain as healthy and safe as possible.

If you have questions about dietary supplements, nutrition and your teeth, please call our office to arrange a consultation. You can learn more in the Dear Doctor magazine article “Vitamins & Dietary Supplements: What Every Consumer Should Know.”

By Gregory J. Gauthier DDS, LLC
January 08, 2014
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral health  
TakingCareofThatAnnoyingBumpinYourMouth

Your mouth’s biting and chewing function is an intricate interplay of your teeth, jaws, lips, cheeks and tongue. Most of the time everything works in orderly fashion, but occasionally the soft tissues of the tongue or cheeks get in the way and are accidentally bitten. The resultant wound creates a traumatic fibroma, an overgrowth of tissue that develops to cover the affected area.

A fibroma consists of fibrous tissue made up of the protein collagen; this traumatized tissue functions much like a callous on a tender spot of skin by binding together the new tissues forming as the wound heals. But because the fibroma is raised on the surface of the cheek more than normal tissue, the chances are high it will be bitten again and reinjured, even multiple times. If this occurs the fibroma becomes tougher and more pronounced.

As it becomes raised and hardened in this way, it becomes more noticeable. More than likely, though, it poses no danger other than as an inconvenience. If it becomes too much of a nuisance, or you have concerns that it’s more than a benign growth, it can be removed with a simple fifteen-minute procedure. An oral surgeon, periodontist or dentist with surgical training will first anesthetize the area with a local anesthetic; the fibroma is then completely excised (removed) and the wound opening sutured with two or three small sutures. Any post-procedure discomfort should be mild and easily managed by pain medication like aspirin or ibuprofen.

Although it’s highly unlikely the fibroma is cancerous, the excised tissue should then be sent for biopsy. Viewing the tissue microscopically is the only definitive way to determine the true nature of the tissue and confirm any diagnosis that the tissue is benign. This is no cause for alarm as it’s a standard healthcare procedure to biopsy this particular kind of excised tissue.

“Bumps and lumps” are common occurrences in the mouth. It’s a good idea to point them out to us during your regular checkups or at any time if you have a concern. In either case, this bothersome problem can be easily treated.

If you would like more information on traumatic fibromas, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Common Lumps and Bumps in the Mouth.”

By Gregory J. Gauthier DDS, LLC
November 18, 2013
Category: Oral Health
ActressJennieGarthSharesTipsforMakingOralHealthFun

Plenty of parents use little tricks to persuade young ones to eat their vegetables, wash their hands, or get to bed on time. But when actress Jennie Garth wanted to help her kids develop healthy dental habits, she took it a step further, as she explained in a recent interview on Fox News.

“Oh my gosh, there's a froggy in your teeth!” the star of the '90s hit series Beverly Hills 90210 would tell her kids. “I've got to get him out!”

When her children — daughters Luca, Lola, and Fiona — spit out the toothpaste, Garth would surreptitiously slip a small toy frog into the sink and pretend it had come from one of their mouths. This amused the kids so much that they became engaged in the game, and let her brush their teeth for as long as necessary.

Garth's certainly got the right idea. Teaching children to develop good oral hygiene habits as early as possible helps set them up for a lifetime of superior dental health. Parents should establish a brushing routine with their kids starting around age 2, when the mouth is becoming filled with teeth. A soft, child's size toothbrush with a pea-sized dab of fluoride toothpaste and plenty of parental help is good for toddlers. By around age 6, when they've developed more manual dexterity, the kids can start taking over the job themselves.

Here's another tip: It's easy to find out how good a cleaning job your kids are doing on their own teeth. Over-the counter products are available that use a system of color coding to identify the presence of bacterial plaque. With these, you can periodically check whether children are brushing effectively. Another way of checking is less precise, but it works anywhere: Just teach them to run their tongue over their teeth. If the teeth fell nice and smooth, they're probably clean, too. If not... it's time to pull out the frog.

And don't forget about the importance of regular dental checkups — both for your kids and yourself. “Like anything, I think our kids mirror what we do,” says Garth. We couldn't agree more.

If you need more information about helping kids develop good oral hygiene — or if it's time for a checkup — don't hesitate to contact us and schedule an appointment. You can learn more in the Dear Doctor magazine article “How to Help Your Child Develop the Best Habits for Oral Health.”

By Gregory J. Gauthier DDS, LLC
November 15, 2013
Category: Oral Health
KeepanEyeonYourOralHealthWhileTakingBloodPressureMedications

One of the top concerns in healthcare is the interactions and side effects of medications. Drugs taken for separate conditions can interact with each other or have an effect on some other aspect of health. It's important then that all your health providers know the various medications you are taking, along with other lifestyle habits. That includes your dental team.

Calcium channel blockers (CCBs) are one type of medication that can have an effect on your oral health. CCBs are used primarily to control hypertension (high blood pressure), and to treat other cardiovascular conditions like angina or abnormal heart rhythm. They work by dilating blood vessels, which makes it easier for the heart to pump.

CCBs are now recognized as a contributing factor in the development of a condition known as gingival hyperplasia in which the gum tissues “overgrow,” extending in some cases abnormally over the teeth. This abnormal growth can be painful and uncomfortable, and can make oral hygiene more difficult to perform. The overgrowth of tissue can also be socially embarrassing.

There's also a secondary factor that can increase the risk for tissue overgrowth in patients taking a CCB — poor oral hygiene. In the absence of a good hygiene routine, a layer of bacterial plaque known as biofilm can build up on tooth surfaces and lead to various forms of gum disease, including hyperplasia. The overgrown tissue contributes in turn to this disease process by inhibiting effective oral hygiene.

If you've already developed gingival hyperplasia or some other form of gum disease, it's important for you to receive periodontal treatment for the disease as soon as possible. Once we have the condition under control, it's then a matter of regular dental checkups and cleanings to reduce the risk of disease, including gingival hyperplasia. We can also help you develop effective hygiene practices that inhibit this condition while you are taking a CCB.

If you would like more information on the effects of medication on oral health, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Blood Pressure Medications.”