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ClearCorrectTM

  • We now have a concise summary of what is involved with ClearCorrect (including an external link to more information)! 

 

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Zoom!TM

  • We now have a summary of what is involved with Zoom!  professional teeth whitening (an external link)!  

 

Patient Newsletter & Education Updates

Instead of our former biweekly e-newsletter, we use Facebook posts, Twitter tweets and the occasional e-mail or blog to provide up-to-date practice information and the latest dental health care news, stories and humor .  If you have any suggested topics for these communications, you can contact us from our website or respond when you recieve an e-mail.   

Online Dental Education Library

Our team strives to improve your health and quality of life by focusing on the preventiion, diagnosis and treatment of conditions associated with your teeth and gums. To supplement our personal care and practice newsletter, we purchased access to an online dental education library to help you learn more about dental problems and available treatments.  To access its content, just click on the selections near the top or on the left side of this page.

Thank you for your interest in learning more about dental health care!  Your increased dental knowledge will help us have a more effective partnership in meeting *your* dental health care needs. 

People who grind their teeth can sometimes develop a serious problem with their jaw, which left untreated, can adversely affect the teeth, gums and bone structures of the mouth.

One of the most common jaw disorders is related to a problem with the temporomandibular joint, the joint that connects your lower jaw to your skull, and allows your upper and lower jaw to open and close and facilitates chewing and speaking.

People with temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD) often have a clicking or popping sound when opening and closing their mouths. Such disorders are often accompanied by frequent headaches, neck aches, and in some cases, tooth sensitivity.

Some treatments for TMD include muscle relaxants, aspirin, biofeedback, or wearing a small plastic appliance in the mouth during sleep.

Minor cases of TMD involve discomfort or pain in the jaw muscles. More serious conditions involve improperly aligned joints or dislocated jaws. The most extreme form of TMD involves an arthritic condition of the jaw joint. Traumatic injuries also can cause jaw dislocation.

In these cases, jaw surgery may be required to correct the condition. Some jaw surgery can be performed arthroscopically.